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Further fancy cuts of diamond

diamond fancy cut

King Cut

(developed by the New York firm "King Diamond Cutters".) (Fig 357) This cut has twelve table facets instead of the eight of a normal brilliant, so that automatically the number of the other facets are increased:

crown 1 table
12 table facets
12 main facets
24 girdle facets
     pavilion
12 main facets
24 girdle facets
1 culet
86 facets
Fig 357 King Cut crown Fig 357 King Cut pavilion Fig 357 King Cut culet
Fig 357 King Cut

Magma Cut

(also developed by a New York firm) has 102 facets, namely:

crown 1 table
10 table facets
20 main facets
30 girdle facets
     pavilion
10 main facets
30 girdle facets
1 culet
102 facets
Fig 358 Magma Cut crown Fig 358 Magma Cut pavilion Fig 358 Magma Cut culet
Fig 358 Magma Cut

In this cut the usual rhombic or kite-shaped crown main facets are subdivided towards the girdle, so that two equal triangular facets are formed. In the same way. the girdle facets are subdivided into three smaller facets.

Both the above cuts have taken over the circular shape of the usual brilliant, but the novelty is, that they do not keep to the ordinary eight-fold symmetry, but adopt in the case of the King-cut a twelve-fold, in the case of the Magma cut a ten-fold symmetry.

Another type of cut was developed by the Belgian diamond cutter, Mr. M. Westreich.

High-Light Cut

This is a standard brilliant with sixteen additional facets, eight of which are crown facets, the other eight pavilion facets, so that in between the main facets there are not two but three girdle facets:

crown 1 table
08 table facets
08 main facets
24 girdle facets
     pavilion
08 main facets
24 girdle facets
1 culet
74 facets
Fig 359 High-Light Cut crown Fig 359 High-Light Cut culet
Fig 359 High-Light Cut

Princess 144

Although the "Princess 144" cut had three predecessors in the "Magma-, King- and High-Light" cuts, it presents a new fantasy shape of the brilliant, which eightfold symmetry it takes over. The additional facets of the "Princess 144" are not formed by the usual sub-division, but are cut under the girdle facets and are more really girdle facets than the triangular facets of the pavilion which are situated between the main facets. The longish facets which point towards the culet form in the new cut small rhombic facets which offer a contrast and liveliness which can be especially noticed when the stone is in movement.

One often finds inexactly cut diamonds where the crown and pavilion are dis­placed, that is the intersection points of the crown and pavilion do not meet or are not directly above each other but are shifted sideways. Because of the additional circle of facets of the "Princess 144", such ugly displacements are avoided. Many brilliants have so-called fringes which are caused by careless cutting and are ugly and diminish the brilliance. It is therefore of advantage to cut the new facets making a more careful working of the girdle obligatory and avoiding a "fringed" girdle.

Fig: 360 Princess 144 Fig: 360 Princess 144

Barion Cut

The Barion cut, invented by Basil Watermeyer, came on the market in 1970.

 The Barion cut represents a mixed cut, with the crown of an emerald cut and the pavilion of a modified brilliant cut. An obvious departure from the latter, however, is that it has only four main facets and four extra half-moon shaped girdle facets; through this a greater optical effect and a higher weight are attai­ned. The circumference of the girdle is square or rectangular. The polished girdle consists of eight facets, some long, some short.

Fig 361 Barion Cut Fig 362 Troidia Cut Fig 362 Troidia Cut
Fig 361 Barion Cut Fig 362 Troidia Cut

Troidia Cut

The Troidia cut originated in France and was patented in 1970 by the diamond cutter Sirakian, and has been cut there since then.

 The Troidia cut 1s a three-cornered cut with three curved sides. It has altoge­ther 47 facets, 27 + table on the crown, and 18 + culet on the pavilion. The girdle is faceted.

Although the pavilion is very shallow the brilliance can be described as lively.

 For manufacturing the Troidia cut only the triangular shallow pieces, so-called "macles" are used, which because of their distorted crystalline structure and frequent twinning are difficult to out.

Taking advantage of the natural crystal habit results in a relatively small loss in weight, which has a favorable effect on the price for stones cut in this form.

Radiant Cut

It is a combination of a brilliant and an emerald cut with a total of 70 facets. This gives the optical effect of a brilliant in an emerald cut diamond.

The Radiant Cut occurs in various facet combinations and has been commercially very successful because of it combines brilliance with relatively little weight loss (Fig 363).

Fig 363 Square and rectangular Radiant Cut
Fig 363 Square and rectangular Radiant Cut
Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut
Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut
Fig 364 Variations of the Radiant Cut

Further fancy cuts of diamond

Fish Butterfly Cross Star cut Horse's head
Fish Butterfly Cross Star Horse's head

Princess Cut

The Princess cut has been especially popular for several years and can be found in the trade with increasing frequency. It has absolutely nothing to do with the previously described Princess 144 and is rather a new and independent kind of cut.

Like the Radiant it is a combination of a brilliant and step cut, so that it is cut as a square or truncated carré, depending on the basic shape of the rough material. If the cube surface of the octahedron is well maintained, a square cut forms with sharp edges. On the other hand, if the corners of the rough stone are slightly damaged the corners are truncated. In general the Princess cut has very good fire and a high degree of brilliance, which explains why it has gained wide acceptance on the diamond market. Probably the most important criterion however has been the small weight loss during maximum use of the natural shape of the stone.

Fig 366 Square Princess Cut Rectangular Princess Cut crown
Fig 366 Square Princess Cut culet Rectangular Princess Cut culet
Fig 366 Square Princess Cut Rectangular Princess Cut
Cut Grading of Fancy Cuts New Diamond Cuts